Showing posts tagged creative economy | Show all posts

What’s Left Over? Art.

This is perhaps a little old, but it’s thought-provoking enough that I had to share it: Colby Cosh on artisan chocolate and social revolution.
Cosh’s blog post/essay muses on some very big ideas about the future of labor and society:
We have learned to live with the fact of life that manufacturing jobs are inherently less labour-intensive [...]

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Creative Placemaking (and Panelmaking) with the NEA

Two weeks ago, I traveled down to DC to take in the “Creative Placemaking” discussion organized by the NEA and hosted by the Canadian Embassy. (Two of the panelists, Tim Jones of Artscape and Richard Florida of all things Richard Florida, are current residents of our neighbor nation to the north.) The goal of the [...]

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Connecting New England’s Creative Communities

As a Watertown, MA native, I know how proud New England is of its firsts. So it doesn’t surprise me that New England has for a long time been on the forefront of the national conversation about the creative economy, thanks in no small part to the longtime leadership of the New England Foundation for [...]

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NEA Cultural Workforce Forum

On Friday, I had the privilege to attend the NEA’s Cultural Workforce Forum, a convening of researchers who have recently led efforts to measure and understand the work habits and economic condition of individual artists in the United States. The event, though not open to the public, was simulcast on the Internet so that anyone [...]

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Featured Member: Synapse Arts Collective

The Chicago-based performance group Synapse Arts Collective creates opportunities for all types of artists to work collaboratively on performance-based projects. Integrating movement experimentation, theater, photography, music, visual art, video, creative writing, and stage design, the group strives to both inspire their audiences and evoke critical thinking and emotion.

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Richard Florida’s Numbers: Shaky Under Scrutiny?

We need more math nerds in the non-profit arts world. And by “math nerd” I’m not talking about experts in multivariate calculus or linear algebra. I just mean people who aren’t afraid of numbers and are willing to poke them with a stick occasionally.
Last week Ian Moss provided one of the most thorough and detailed [...]

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Gentrification, Income Inequality, and Crime

Today’s Metro New York reports on a scary crime wave in Williamsburg, Brooklyn:
Of Brooklyn’s police precincts, Williamsburg’s 90th, which encompasses the gentrifying South Side plus its central and east sections, has seen the greatest rise in crime over the past year — 13.49 percent — according to Compstat data. The neighboring 94th precinct, which includes [...]

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Obama’s Street Cred

Watching the Democratic National Convention last night, I was struck by one of the most significant but rarely discussed aspects of a potential Obama presidency.  Barack Obama would be the first president in memory - to my knowledge the first since Teddy Roosevelt - to come from an urban background.  He grew up in Honolulu [...]

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UN releases first report on the global creative economy

With the preponderance of depressing headlines about the US economy, those of us in the arts should be proud to know that it’s an industry that continues to experience growth. That’s according to the UN’s report on the global creative economy, released on April 20th.
The report itself is an ambitious and dense 357-page read that [...]

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