Showing posts tagged it’s the infrastructure | Show all posts

The Wrong Way to Protect IP

For a few months now we’ve been tracking a couple of ostensibly artist-friendly bills in Congress that are designed to enhance the ability of copyright-holders to enforce their rights online by shutting down websites dedicated to piracy of intellectual property. Think MP3s, movies, and filesharing (and some more nefarious stuff, too, like Russian websites that [...]

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What Does the Scuttled ARC Tunnel Have to Do With the Arts?

I’ll begin this post with a confession, one that will no doubt deeply undermine my street cred in some circles of the arts community. I live in the New Jersey suburbs. Yes, yes, it’s true, I’m part of the “bridge and tunnel” crowd. (If this is a problem for you, then you’re welcome to buy [...]

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Creative Rights & Artists

This week, Fractured Atlas is partnering with our friends at ArtsJournal, Future of Music Coalition, and the National Alliance for Media Arts + Culture to host a discussion about artists’ creative rights and arts policy / advocacy more generally. Fractured Atlas’s Director of Technology Programs, Justin Karr, and I are two of the 22 featured bloggers. If you’re [...]

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We Want Your Ideas! Investing in Infrastructure for the Arts

The Economist has a short piece about the opportunities and pitfalls in Obama’s plan to make massive investments in infrastructure projects.  The writer observes that the US has historically underinvested in infrastructure, while the projects that are carried out are funded in a haphazard manner through Congressional member items with little or no federal oversight [...]

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Obama’s Street Cred

Watching the Democratic National Convention last night, I was struck by one of the most significant but rarely discussed aspects of a potential Obama presidency.  Barack Obama would be the first president in memory - to my knowledge the first since Teddy Roosevelt - to come from an urban background.  He grew up in Honolulu [...]

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San Francisco Prioritizes Artist Housing

Here in NYC, the idea of setting aside affordable housing for artists is considered politically poisonous. The reasoning is that as soon as you designate housing - our city’s most precious and sought-after resource - for a particular occupation or industry, then the flood gates inevitably open. “Why not affordable housing for nurses, or [...]

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Case for Funding a Healthy Arts Ecosystem

Ian Moss at Createquity makes a compelling case for arts philanthropy that focuses on infrastructure and avoids self-perpetuating cults of personality:
I don’t think it’s incumbent upon foundations to judge artistic merit. There are plenty of other people in this world who are perfectly capable of doing that, and arguably more qualified: curators, journalists, other artists, [...]

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