Showing posts tagged research | Show all posts

Two New Research Publications from Fractured Atlas

A couple of years ago, we redesigned our fiscal sponsorship annual report to match up more closely with the format of the Cultural Data Project, an emerging data standard for cataloging financial, operational and programmatic information relating to arts nonprofits. In September 2012, we reaped the first fruits of that evolution in the form of [...]

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Come be nerdy with us in Santa Cruz!

Have you ever wondered what all this impact assessment and evaluation stuff is all about, but haven’t been sure how to get started? We bet you’re not alone! That’s why we’re psyched to be involved with a great and affordable professional development event happening this summer in gorgeous Santa Cruz, CA, called Museum Camp 2014: [...]

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Fractured Atlas as a Learning Organization: An Introduction

If you’ve been paying any attention at all to technology trends the past few years, you know that we live in the era of Big Data. All of those videos we upload to YouTube, hard drives we fill with government secrets (or cat photos, take your pick), and tweets we awkwardly punch out on touchscreen [...]

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“Discovering Fiscally Sponsored NYC Dancemakers”

That’s the title of the new study published this month by Dance/NYC and produced by yours truly, with (lots of) help from Fractured Atlas Research Fellow Carrie Blake and Dance/NYC Director Lane Harwell. The study examines data from over 250 dance-related projects fiscally sponsored by Fractured Atlas, The Foundation for Independent Artists/Pentacle, New York Foundation for [...]

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In Defense of Logic Models

Photo by 7073k
Last month, my post Creative Placemaking Has an Outcomes Problem generated a lot of discussion about creative placemaking and grantmaking strategy, much of it really great. If you haven’t had a chance, please check out these thoughtful and substantive responses by–just to name a few–Richard Layman, Niels Strandskov, Seth Beattie, Lance Olson, Andrew [...]

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Creative Placemaking Has an Outcomes Problem

“I feel like whenever I talk to artists these days, I should be apologizing,” says Kevin Stolarick, Research Director for the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management. To most in the arts community, Stolarick is better known as Richard Florida’s longtime right-hand man and research collaborator on his bestselling [...]

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Fractured Atlas Seeking Stellar Research Fellows

So maybe you saw yesterday’s External Relations Associate posting and you thought, “well, I do have phenomenal writing chops - but I also can make fireworks out of spreadsheets and am kind of obsessed with data in a borderline unhealthy way. Also, I’m not ready for a full-time commitment, and need the flexibility to work [...]

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Dispatch from the Bay Area, Part I: Navigating the Velocity of Change

(originally posted at Createquity.com)
A few weeks ago, I had the privilege of representing Fractured Atlas at the Grantmakers in the Arts Conference, an annual gathering of funders that is otherwise closed to non-grantmakers. This year’s conference was in San Francisco and San Jose, and below is a summary of some of the more stimulating sessions [...]

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An Ecosystem-Based Approach to Arts Research

(Part of an occasional series on Fractured Atlas’s research philosophy and practices. For more articles, click here.)
As those of you who have been following Fractured Atlas closely may know, we’ve been working on some innovative technological solutions for aggregating and analyzing data about the cultural sector for the past couple of years. This effort is [...]

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Whither the Time Machine? Considering the Counterfactual in Arts Marketing

(Cross-posted from the National Arts Marketing Project Conference Blog Salon over at ARTSBlog.)
The hardest question to answer in arts research is “what would have happened if we had done things differently?” Researchers call this question the “counterfactual,” since it refers to a scenario that doesn’t actually exist. Generally speaking, it’s hard to measure things that don’t [...]

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