Showing posts tagged wonkishness | Show all posts

It’s Constitutional: Now What?

Two weeks after the Supreme Court upheld the Affordable Care Act the forecast for the future health insurance landscape is unclear. The media is, unsurprisingly, awash in commentary but for solid background the SCOTUS blog has a down-to-earth summary of the proceedings, and our own Adam Huttler discusses the importance of this victory for the [...]

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Gary Shapiro Does Not Approve of Your Sloth

Fractured Atlas has campaigned tirelessly to make benefits like health insurance available to artists and other creative entrepreneurs. So we couldn’t help but notice this blog post by Gary Shapiro, President of the Consumer Electronics Association, attacking House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi for promoting the idea that artists should have access to affordable health insurance.
The [...]

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Op Ed in the Philadelphia Inquirer

I’ve got an Op Ed in yesterday’s Philadelphia Inquirer. Here’s the complete text:
America’s artists: Canaries in the health-care mine
America’s two million artists understand what it means to be a worker in the 21st century, independent, untethered, and mostly expected to fend for themselves.
So for them, the number of uninsured Americans isn’t an abstract statistic. It’s [...]

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Tell Obama About the Arts and Health Care

The Obama administration is looking for personal stories about the need for health care reform. This is a great opportunity to ensure that the arts community isn’t left out of this debate.
Remember that not all health care reform proposals are created equal. Some - such as those designed to expand employer-based coverage - would actually [...]

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Federal aid for state budgets

Paul Krugman has some insightful things to say about the urgent need for federal aid for struggling states during a fiscal crisis:
[S]tate and local governments operate under fiscal rules that lead to booming spending and tax cuts when the economy is strong and the reverse when the economy is weak. This is bad governance: services [...]

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PolicyArchive.org

If you’re feeling wonky or if you’re just looking for respected sources to cite in your next grant application, you should check out PolicyArchive.org, a new website from the Center for Governmental Studies.
PolicyArchive is an innovative, new digital archive of global, non-partisan public policy research. It makes use of the power, efficiency, and economy of [...]

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An Army of Artists

“If every artist in America‚Äôs work force banded together, their ranks would be double the size of the United States Army,” reports Sam Roberts in today’s NY Times. This conclusion is drawn from a groundbreaking new report from the National Endowment for the Arts titled Artists in the Workforce: 1990-2005.
I realize not everyone will [...]

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Orphan Works Act of 2008

It’s been a while since a bill in Congress has sparked as much panicked hand-wringing in the arts community as the Orphan Works Act of 2008 (pdf).

The Illustrators’ Partnership of America calls it “cultural theft on an unprecedented scale.”
Tom Richmond says it is “a license to steal.”
Mark Simon really goes over the top:
You May Lose [...]

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Federal Regulation of Insurance

My apologies for another wonky health insurance post hot on the heels of the last one, but when there’s a major newspaper op ed on a subject I’ve been ranting about for years I can’t resist…
In today’s Wall Street Journal, Congressman Ed Royce (R., Calif) makes the case for federal regulation of the insurance [...]

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Krugman and Florida Duke it Out

Two of my intellectual heroes, Paul Krugman and Richard Florida, are in the midst of a cross-publication debate over the macro-economic significance of “mega-regions”. It began with Florida’s piece in the Wall Street Journal, which was greeted with skepticism from Krugman. Florida got a bit nasty in response.
Understanding the role and significance of [...]

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